Tag Archives: Hosting

Cloud Server Performance Metrics

It’s hard to really know what you get when buying cloud services today. Depending on the vendor they might sell their services with set amounts of “cores”, or “compute units”, or “vCPUs”. Storage might be spinning disks in speeds ranging from 7,200 RPM to 15,000 RPM or the storage might be newer solid state drives which come in MLC, SLC, and a large variety of performance levels. RAM quantities are fairly straight forward (though is that gigabyte 1,000 or 1,024 megabytes?) but the speed levels of RAM vary drastically. Read more »

Stopping All Sites on a Windows Server Without Stopping IIS

I had a need recently to stop all the sites running on a Windows server, but I didn’t want to stop IIS. This specific server has hundreds of sites running on it, so stopping each one at a time would have taken an excessive amount of time.

So with a little Google-fu I stumbled across an old post that leverages appcmd

c:\windows\system32\inetsrv\appcmd.exe list site /xml /state:"$=started" | appcmd stop site /in

This single command will pull a list of all the sites that currently have a running state of “started” and then pipe that list into the stop command. This runs super-fast even on a server with hundreds of sites – very impressive and using this saved me tons of time!

Happy IIS hosting! :)

By the way, here’s the inverse of this script to restart all the sites on an IIS server.

The Lastest Version of WordPress

I got behind again on my WordPress updates – I can be pretty lazy about that with the theory of “if it ain’t broke…” but I was doing a post or two today and the available updates were screaming at me (well, that little icon kept catching my eye). I had 6 plugin updates and one full WordPress update available.

So, I took the plunge. Being a Windows guy, and a long time server guy, I’m ALWAYS nervous about updates. But once again WordPress held strong and true. Every one of the updates processes flawlessly without any issues at all.

Good for you WordPress.

BTW – I like the new administration console interface. Very nice. :)

Happy hosting!

Convert a Folder to an Application on a Remote IIS Host

The topic recently came up of the best way to convert a folder to an application on remote shared hosting server. Some hosts may have this built-in to their control panel. I know many (like Cytanium) have options in the control panel to create Virtual Directories, but sometimes an application specifically needs its folder to be marked as a literal “application” within IIS. Read more »

OrcsWeb Cloud Servers Compared to CloudServers.com

MeInRedJacketI’m running two primary brands now – still one company, ORCS Web, Inc., but two main brands… www.orcsweb.com (high-touch managed hosting) and www.cloudservers.com (IaaS unmanaged cloud servers).

Both brands sell cloud servers. Both brands have both email and phone support.

CloudServers.com Windows servers start at $34/month. OrcsWeb Windows cloud servers start at $99/month. BUT, when you go through and configure both apples-to-apples, the OrcsWeb server is only about 10% higher priced. And there are additional services included, and differences, that justify that difference in price:

  • Every OrcsWeb server has uptime monitoring that pages the support team 24×7 and they will respond to address any issue that arises – or contact the client as needed – even with the minimum level of managed services that are included in the base rate. CloudServers.com clients are responsible for configuring their own monitoring and responding to any issues specific to their server (not architectural).
  • OrcsWeb cloud servers are members of the OrcsWeb domain – allowing the support team to access the server to assist customers with any troubleshooting, performance analysis, or problem solving. CloudServers.com servers are not joined with any domain and the support staff has no direct administrative access to the systems.
  • Everyone OrcsWeb cloud server sits behind redundant high-powered physical firewalls that not only block all but primary ports, but also provides intrusion prevention services. Every CloudServers.com cloud server comes with its own virtual firewall. This provides a great additional layer of security but doesn’t have the advanced features of the OrcsWeb firewall solution.
  • OrcsWeb cloud servers are powered by VMware’s enterprise class (and license level) product solutions that are feature-rich and targeted toward a more enterprise level project and customer. CloudServers.com leverages CentOS, KVM, and a variety of different products for its cloud server architecture.

So which is best? It really all depends on your needs. If you want Linux, then CloudServers.com is the only choice today – OrcsWeb may start supporting Linux soon but it doesn’t currently. If you want an extension of your IT team to help with crafting solutions and assisting with any issues that might come up, OrcsWeb is best for you. If you self-administer your servers and just want cost-effective, yet still full-featured and fast-performing cloud servers, then CloudServers.com is best for you.

Hope this help clear up any confusion. If you are looking for cloud server hosting, be sure to check out whichever brand best matches your needs. Feel free to email and/or call in and speak with someone about either solution.

Happy hosting